Visit Historic Carthage, Missouri on Old Route 66

Carthage, Missouri was established in 1842 and served as the county seat of Jasper County. The state of Missouri was located between the secessionist southern states and the abolitionist northern states. As a result, several civil war battles occurred in and around Carthage along with very violent attacks from southern guerrillas. The first battle at Carthage occurred on July 5, 1861 and again in October 1863. Carthage was also burned by Confederate guerrillas in September 1864. Carthage, Missouri was reconstructed during the Victorian era.

carthage mo courthouse

Jasper County Courthouse, Carthage Missouri

Carthage from the Civil War and Beyond

As mentioned above the state of Missouri was at a real crossroads at the start of the American Civil War and Carthage, Missouri was one of the flashpoints. Missouri’s loyalties were divided at the outset of the Civil War and the war tore the state apart.

After the civil war, Carthage was a prosperous rail town,as well as a supplier of  “Carthage Marble” and a busy highway crossroads when U.S. Highways 66 and 71 came to town in 1926. The new Route 66 from Chicago, Illinois to Santa Monica, California was a economic boost to many towns along it’s path. One of the first concrete-paved portions of Missouri’s highway system was the stretch of road west of Carthage to Joplin, laid in 1920. In 1926, this route became part of Route 66.

Jasper County Courthouse

Carthage enjoys a rich history which is reflected in the many structures found throughout the city.

The current Jasper County Courthouse, built of Carthage stone in 1894, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. This Romanesque Revival building is constructed of Carthage stone and listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Its turrets, towers and arches evoke the feel of a medieval castle looming over the city below.

The building is great to look at from the outside but even more fascinating when you enter. On the ground floor in the main hallway are cases filled with historic artifacts. There is a case that shows you the mining history, artifacts from Route 66, an old phone booth, and even a mine from the Spanish American War. One of the most interesting features was the mural of the history of Carthage complete with narration.

carthage courthouse square

Carthage Courthouse Square

Carthage Courthouse Square

Carthage Courthouse Square Historic District is, as the name implies, a grouping of shops and stores, most of them with relatively unspoiled nineteenth-century facades, set in traditional Southern fashion around a courthouse.

Carthage Courthouse Square Historic District is significant in American architecture for several reasons. First, it superlatively illustrates the two major phases of post-Civil War commercial architecture — brick Italianate and Romanesque Revival. In addition, the Carthage Courthouse Square Historic District and its side streets contain unusual and beautiful examples of cast-iron ornamentation.

Carthage Civil War Museum

A museum filled with information and artifacts covering the Civil War Battle of Carthage and the Civil War in southwest Missouri. The museum covers the history of the Battle of Carthage, the first full-scale land battle of the Civil War. The museum displays offer an excellent explanation of the several battles and the effects of the War on the area of southwest Missouri .There is also a display on the outlaw Belle Starr, who grew up in Carthage during the Civil War. The museum is located at 205 S. Grant St.

Boots Court-Motel

Another historic structure going back to the days of old Route 66 is the Boots Court-Motel. The Boots Court – Motel was built in 1939 by Arthur Boots, and still carries his name today.

carthage boots motel

Boots Motel

Americans took to the road in unprecedented numbers with the lifting of World War Two rationing and travel restrictions during the Mother Road’s golden age that began in 1945.

The “Motel” was saved from demolition by two sisters who are presently restoring the property to the way it was in 1949, and with the five rooms in the detached annex being completed and opened-for-business in 2012.

Battle of Carthage State Historic Site

This historic site is the location of the final confrontation of the Battle of Carthage, a day-long running skirmish that began on July 5, 1861, about 9 miles northeast of Carthage. Battle of Carthage State Historic Site preserves a small area associated with the battle, as skirmishes were spread over 10 miles. The Battle of Carthage involved the Missouri State Guard, a pro-Southern force, against Union volunteer regiments.

carthage civil war battlefieldThe Battle of Carthage was the earliest full-scale battle of the Civil War, preceding Bull Run by 11 days. Battle of Carthage State Historic Site contains a quiet meadow and the spring that made the area an encampment for both the Union and Confederate troops during the battle.

The area is little changed in its appearance since the battle was fought on July 5, 1861. A few minutes off of Interstate 44, the site interprets the battle that set the stage for a decisive showdown a month later at Wilson’s Creek.

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Kansas Route 66 Attractions

Texas Old Courthouse Tour

Carthage, Missouri features more than 600 buildings listed on the National Registry of Historic Places. These are buildings and structures that at one time housed a wide variety of individuals including Civil War guerrillas, wild west outlaws, business titans, Ragtime musicians and women’s rights pioneers.

Carthage is located just six miles north of Interstate-44 in southwestern Missouri and very close to the Kansas border. The city offers great historic tourist sites that highlight it’s early years including the devastation and battles of the Civil War and the days that Route 66 brought travelers through by the thousands.

It’s a must stop when your travels take you through southwest Missouri and well worth the time.

(Article and photos copyright Trips Into History)

One Of A Kind Trip Stops Along Old Route 66

Old Route 66

The old Route 66 is one of the most historic drives in North America. this highway stretching from Chicago, Illinois to Santa Monica, California in many ways tells the story of the modern day expansion across America’s Southwest. Over the decades portions of  Route 66 were altered and with the beginning of the Interstate highway system, a good portion of the Mother Road was lost altogether.

amarillo route 66The western road traveler can still find substantial portions of the old Mother Road in several states. The longest uninterrupted section being found in western Arizona. Many old landmarks remain and the signage you’ll see on the Interstates are pretty good in pointing them out.

During the heyday of Route 66 travel, motels sprang up right and left. Prior to the Interstate Highway System, Route 66 was the main artery into the southwest and into California. Thousands of people traveled the Mother Road to California during the Great Depression as was chronicled in John Steinbeck‘s 1939 novel, The Grapes of Wrath.

Route 66 was the trail out of the Dust Bowl of the 1930’s and hopefully to a new start and employment in California.

old route 66 bridges

Old Route 66 bridge west of Albuquerque, NM

Surviving Landmarks Along Today’s Route 66

Some of the Route 66 landmarks still remaining include bridges, abandoned service  This applies to towns and cities all along Interstate 40 from Oklahoma all the way to the West Coast. When you exit the Interstates and take a short drive through many of these towns there is quite a lot of old history to explore. Along this stretch of Interstate 40 you’ll find that the original old route still runs through the center of many towns and cities, usually as main street. This is true even though the Interstate itself passes either north or south of the town.

Theaters

When Route 66 was being developed during the 1920’s, the movie theater industry was expanding. As a result there still remains many old theater buildings along old Route 66 with the type of architecture you don’t see too often today. Some theaters of note along the way include the Kimo Theater on old Route 66 in downtown Albuquerque New Mexico. The Kimo’s art deco style is very unique.

The Kimo design  is actually Art Deco blended in to the Southwest style. Many believe that the Kimo Theater is Albuquerque’s most popular landmark. The city purchased the theater in 1977 to keep it from being demolished. There have been several renovations and today the Kimo Theater is open showing films, featuring live plays and is also used for various private and civic functions.

albuquerque historic landmarks

Kimo Theater, Albuquerque, NM

Amarillo Texas also offers an historic old movie theater. The Paramount Theater was located in the southern section of downtown Amarillo about one block off old Route 66. The Paramount Theater was built in 1932. Similar to many large theaters built in this period, The Paramount Theater included a wide-set staircase with covered with maroon carpeting as it curved to the upper balcony seating area. The theater could seat 1,200 beneath a blue sunburst design on the ceiling. The one large screen was behind heavily draped curtains and gold framing. The Paramount in Amarillo charged fifteen cents for admission when it opened for business during the Great Depression. The Paramount Theater building still sports it’s marquee and definitely worth a drive by when passing through downtown Amarillo, Texas. Today the handsome and historic structure serves as an office building.

Grants, New Mexico is also the site of an old rundown theater that was built during the Great Depression in 1937. The theater is found along the main street through town which happens to be old Route 66. Grants is located about 79 miles west of Albuquerque via Interstate 40. The Lux Theater was capable of seating some 500 plus patrons

Much of the structure which is situated in a strip of three buildings is now boarded up but the marquee and old neon tubing remains. The theater was built when a great many people traveled Route 66, many heading west to California looking for employment.

Historic Hotels

East of Flagstaff you’ll find a luxury hotel, La Posada, directly on old Route 66 in Winslow Arizona. The La Posada was originally built by Fred Harvey and the Atchison Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad.It was and still remains a popular and historic destination.

This Route 66 landmark was originally built next to the Winslow train station in 1929. Winslow was chosen as an ideal site for another Harvey House because it’s location in Winslow is a days drive or less from many popular northern Arizona tourist destinations  including the Grand Canyon to the west and Navajo Reservation just to the north. The La Posada Harvey House could attract travelers from either the railroad line or old Route 66. The AT & SF railroad operated the hotel for twenty-seven years and then closed it to the public in 1957.

old harvey house hotels

Interior of La Posada Hotel, Winslow, AZ

The future of the structure was of course in doubt when the railroad gave it up. The fear of many was that the building might be torn down. Efforts were underway to preserve it. The National Trust for Historic Preservation became aware of the situation and became involved. Fortunately, the La Posada Hotel was purchased by a small group that restored the hotel to it’s grand condition.

The hotel is very popular today with many making it a regular stop when traveling through Winslow. If you travel on Interstate 40, you will enjoy stopping at Winslow and visiting and/or lodging at this historic hotel. If you’re traveling on Amtrak’s Southwest Chief, the train makes a scheduled stop at the hotel.

There’s plenty of interesting sites to see along the old Route 66. If you haven’t driven this historic route yet we recommend it as a fun and educational family trip.

(Article and photos copyright Trips Into History)

Drive the Historic Illinois Lincoln Highway / History and Attractions

This feature article is about  the Illinois Lincoln Highway which extends across the state east to west for a length of 179 miles. Before we describe the Illinois section of this historic transcontinental highway, we want to offer you a brief history about this early 1900’s project along with some of the people who made it possible.

lincoln highway route markerRoads Before the Lincoln Highway

The Lincoln Highway was the nation’s first transcontinental highway.The highway, planned in 1913, had a positive lasting effect that fostered the Good Roads movement which also led to the establishment of the historic Route 66.

Prior to the conception of the Lincoln Highway, automobile manufacturers were growing by leaps and bounds but the highway situation in the country was something else altogether. In 1912 there were actually no decent roads (for automobile driving) in the U.S. There was no asphalt and concrete at that time and the definition of an improved road was simply one that was graded. There was also no general road plan. Roads would generally lead outside of a town in all directions.

Names Behind the Creation of the Lincoln Highway

Leaders were needed to galvanize action to make a coast to coast highway possible. Money would have to be raised and to accomplish this an adequate amount of promotion to the public was necessary. Help from the Detroit automakers and suppliers would be  essential, most importantly from people like Henry Ford.

Most credit Carl Fisher with the original idea for this coast to coast national highway. Fisher is well known for several endeavors including the co-founding and building of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway at 16th Street and Georgetown Road, about six miles est of downtown Indianapolis, IN.

joliet illinois lincoln highway

Downtown Joliet, Illinois

Fisher worked on a plan that in addition to building funds from automakers and auto suppliers, towns along the way would provide equipment and enjoy the commercial benefits of being located on this transcontinental highway. Another source of revenue would come from the public who for $5 each could be members of this historic highway.

As it turned out, Henry Ford refused to help fund the highway, believing that it as the public’s responsibility. Those however who joined Carl Fisher did include Henry Joy, the president of the Packard Motor Car Company and Frank Seiberling, president of Goodyear Tire Company.

Naming the Highway

At the time of the organizing and fund raising, there was no name chosen for the future highway.  It just so happened that the federal government was mulling over spending $1.7 million for a marble monument in honor of Abraham Lincoln. Henry Joy from Packard came up with the idea for naming the highway after Lincoln and he and Carl Fisher then urged Congress to use the monument funds for the highway construction instead. The argument was that a transcontinental highway would make a much higher profile monument to the late President.

Routing the Highway

States were lobbying for routes that of course would be beneficial to them. As it turned out, the route chosen for the New York City to San Francisco federal highway would essentially be the most direct one. The Lincoln Highway has the distinction of being the first paved transcontinental highway in the nation.

The Illinois Lincoln Highway

Today, the Illinois Lincoln Highway is a 179 mile long National Scenic Byway. Travel this highway that runs through northern Illinois and discover each town and city’s unique culture and historic sites and landmarks.

The Lincoln Highway route enters Illinois on the east at the town of Lynwood and leaves the state on the west over the Mississippi River. The highway is comprised through Illinois via U.S. 30, and Illinois Routes 31 and 38.

The Illinois Lincoln Highway Coalition along with many local historians, artists and various civic leaders are all credited for the unique thirty-five interpretive murals along the Lincoln Highway. An excellent website with a detailed description of each mural is…http://www.drivelincolnhighway.com/murals/

You may also enjoy additional Trips Into History articles found on the links below…

Drive Wisconsin’s Picturesque Lake Superior Scenic Byway

Travel Michigan’s Copper Harbor Scenic Highway

Chicago’s Magnificent Mile / Historic Fourth Presbyterian Church

ronald reagan boyhood home dixon illinois

Ronald Reagan Boyhood Home, Dixon, IL

More attractions along the Illinois Lincoln Highway include Ronald Reagan’s Home and Visitor Center in Dixon, the 1950’s Midway Drive-In Theater in Sterling, Original 1928 Lincoln Highway concrete markers in Ashton, the 1926 Rialto Square Theater in Joliet, the Black Hawk Statue, the Eternal Indian in Oregon and many more.

Just as with the old Route 66 built years later, the Lincoln Highway spurred the opening of motor courts, diners and gas stations, drive-ins, roadside stands selling just about everything and of course hamburger stands. All things that served the motorist sprang up. Driving these historic highways today is truly taking a trip back into history as some of these old structures still exist today and several museums display photos of Illinois’ Lincoln Highway early years.

illinois lincoln highway route

 

 

 

 

 

100 Year Anniversary in 2015

In commemoration of 100 years since the opening of the Lincoln Highway, the Lincoln Highway Association will host the “Henry B. Joy” Tour. The tour will run from June 27-July 8, 2015. The 2015 Tour will depart the Packard Proving Grounds north of Detroit, Michigan on Saturday, June 27 and take 12 days to travel 2,836 miles across America, arriving at the Lincoln Highway Western Terminus in San Francisco, California on Wednesday, July 8.  For more information on joining this tour including rates and details, see website…..http://www.lincolnhighwayassoc.org/tour/2015/

Some very good books on the historic Lincoln Highway include…..Lincoln Highway Across Illinois, The Images of America by David A. Belden and Christine O’Brien…..Greetings from the Lincoln Highway: A Road Trip Celebration of America’s First Coast-to-Coast Highway by Brian Butko…...Lincoln Highway Companion: A Guide to America’s First Coast-to-Coast Road by Brian Butko.

(Article copyright Trips Into History. Photo of Reagan Boyhood Home courtesy of Ivo Shandor, CC By 2.5. Remaining photos and images in the public domain)

Along the Mighty Mississippi / Travel the Meeting of the Great Rivers Scenic Byway

One of the best trips available to anyone wanting to explore our country’s history are the many scenic byways found east and west and everywhere in between. One of the most popular of these highways runs along the eastern bank of the Mississippi River and makes a great family trip back into history.

In southwestern Illinois, locals as well as tourists have a very unique trail to explore. For thirty-three scenic miles is The Meeting of the Great Rivers Scenic Route which was made an Illinois State Scenic Byway on June 8, 1998. There are no fees along the byway proper and ferries on the byway are free.

great river route illinois

Great River Route

The Historic Mississippi

All through history, the Mississippi River impacted numerous lives: the Dakota, Chippewa, and Hopewell societies; early French voyagers; African-Americans looking for opportunity on the Underground Railroad; and a lot of people more. Through its beguiling stream towns and metropolitan urban communities, notable locales and social antiques, today’s Great River Road still connects communities, individuals, and history.

The Great Rivers Meet

This stretch where the Mississippi River meets the Missouri is an historic site. The Mississippi, a working waterway, is additionally an ecological fortune. Memorable eighteenth century waterway towns, islands, bars, focuses, and twists make excellent view underneath limestone feigns that are secured by timberlands reaching out over about 20,000 sections of land.

Following are just a few of the many attractions and historic sites along and near to the Meeting of the Great Rivers Scenic Route.

meeting of the great rivers scenic highway

Great Rivers highway north of Alton, Illinois

The National Great Rivers Museum

Opened in October 2003, this excellent and well laid out museum is committed to telling the story of everyday life on the Mighty Mississippi River and how it has molded our society, history, economy, biology and individuals. The National Great Rivers Museum has more than 20 interactive displays concentrating on the cycles of the waterway, nature, scow activity, water utilization and plenty more.

A plethora of history relating to life on the waterway and a complete explanation of why we need locks on the river for efficient transportation. The museum offers reasons why all should take an interest in the preservation of our country’s rivers. The National Great Rivers Museum is located at 2 Lock and Dam Way, Alton, Illinois.

Lewis & Clark Confluence Tower

The Lewis & Clark Confluence Tower is the gateway to the Meeting of the Great Rivers National Scenic Byway. The northern tower features a visitors center. When you’re at the visitors center you can plan your thirty-three mile journey down the scenic byway. The visitors center features videos and graphic displays that tell stories of history, wildlife and communities all along this historic and scenic path

The Lewis & Clark Confluence Tower is located in Hartford, Illinois. This is two miles from the Lewis & Clark State Historic Site. The Lewis & Clark Confluence Tower was built in commemoration of the historic expedition to the northwest and the Pacific. The tower which is 180 feet tall offers visitors three viewing areas at the 50, 100 and 150 foot levels. These connect the two towers that were built to represent Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark and the Mississippi and Missouri rivers. The location of the towers is at 435 Confluence Tower Dr., Hartford, Illinois.

Wood River Museum and Visitors Center

The Wood River Heritage Council has worked diligently to preserve the town’s history. The Wood River Museum and Visitors Center is the place to visit to learn all about area events such as the Wood River massacre of 1814, the Flood of 1915, Olde Towne. and the history of Standard Oil’s impact on the community. The museum is located at 40 W. Ferguson Avenue, Wood River, Illinois.

You may also enjoy the Trips Into History articles found on the links below…

A Drive on Wisconsin’s Lake Superior Scenic Byway

Michigan’s Copper Harbor Scenic Byway

meeting of the great rivers map

Meeting of the Great Rivers Map

 

Pere Marquette Cross

French explorer Louis Joliet and Jesuit priest Father Jacques Marquette led the first French expedition down the Mississippi River in June of 1673 in search of the Pacific Ocean.

Their expedition followed the Mississippi River south to the mouth of the Arkansas River. When reaching that point the Native Americans they encountered told them they were only about ten days away from the Gulf of Mexico. The expedition leaders decided to turn around for home lest they be captured by either the Indians or the Spaniards.

There were positive things that came from the expedition although finding the Pacific Ocean was not one of them. Marquette and Joliet were credited with establishing relations with the Native American tribes that they met along the way. What they learned of the area eventually led to the French taking possession of Louisiana.

lewis & clark towers harford illinois

Lewis & Clark Towers, Hartford, Illinois

Cut from a solid piece of dolomite, the Pere Marquette Cross is seven feet six inches high. It is located on a ledge of a bluff that overlooks the Illinois River. Two flights of dolomite stairs lead from the Sam Vadalabene Bike Trail to the cross. The Pere Marquette monument is located 4 1/2 miles east of the main Park entrance on the Great River Road.The location is 13122 Visitor Center Lane, Grafton, Illinois.

More Information

The north end of this scenic route is at the Pere Marquette State Park. The southern end of the route is at the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers.

For more information about planning a trip along the Meeting of the Great Rivers Scenic Route, check out the websites listed below.

Greatriversbywway.com

Meeting of the Great Rivers Visitors Guide

(Article copyright 2014 Trips Into History. Route map image courtesy of the Dept of Transportation, Great River Route Highway Photo and Lewis & Clark photo courtesy of the Federal Highway Dept. Great Rivers Highway photo north of Alton, Illinois courtesy Kbh3rd, CC 3.0 license.)

Drive Wisconsin’s Picturesque Lake Superior Scenic Byway

The State of Wisconsin features several scenic byways that will help make your trip unforgettable and also offer some great photo opportunities.

Wisconsin’s newest scenic byway is in the very picturesque northern part of the state along the shores of Lake Superior on the lake’s western end.

lake superior scenic byway map

Wisconsin lake Superior Scenic Byway route

Wisconsin’s Scenic Byway Program

The Wisconsin Scenic Byway Program began in 1999 when a new state law directed the state Department of Transportation to develop and administer a scenic byway program.

Today, there are a total of four Wisconsin Scenic Byways with the addition of the newest one, the Wisconsin lake Superior Scenic Byway. The other three scenic byways are the Great River Road, the Lower Wisconsin River Road and the Door County Coastal Byway.

The program is a cooperative effort between local communities and WisDOT to identify and promote state highway corridors with scenic and/or historical attributes that provide travelers an enjoyable visual, educational and recreational experience. A scenic byway is at least 30 miles in length and is other than an Interstate Highway.

lake superior shoreline

Lake Superior shoreline

Wisconsin Lake Superior Scenic Byway

The Wisconsin Lake Superior Scenic Byway  is a 70-mile route of State Hwy. 13 from U.S. Hwy. 2 just west of Ashland to County H in Douglas County. This 70 mile route is beautiful with a variation of forested areas and stunning coastal views. 

On April 18, 2013, a ribbon cutting ceremony at StageNorth Theater in Washburn made the Wisconsin Lake Superior Scenic Byway official. Among the many sites to visiti and enjoy on this scenic byway is access to the Apostle Islands National Lakeshore, the Northwest Wildlife Refuge Lands and the Chequamegon National Forest.

The route of the Wisconsin lake Superior Scenic Byway includes the cities of Bayfield and Washburn; the Red Cliff Tribal lands; the towns of Barksdale, Bayfield, Bayview, Bell, Clover, Cloverland, Orienta, Port Wing and Russell; and the unincorporated areas of Cornucopia, Herbster and Port Wing.

Apostle Islands

The Apostle Islands Lakeshore in Wisconsin is a very popular tourist destination for summer time tourists. Here you will see beautifully forested islands and one hundred year old lighthouses. In all there are eight historic lighthouses on the Apostle Islands. Some of the popular ways to explore the islands is by hiking and by kayak.

Wildlife at this National Lakeshore includes black bears and bald eagles. Apostle Islands National Lakeshore is administered by the National Park Service. For more detailed information see website www.nps.gov/apis/index.htm

In Bayfield you’ll want to stop by at the Apostle Island National Lakeshore Visitor Center. The Visitor Center is located inside the old county courthouse. The Visitor Center offers exhibits, audio visual programs and plenty of information about touring the islands and recreational opportunities.

See the Trips Into History articles on the links below…

Driving the Los Caminos Antiguos Scenic Byway

Tour Michigan’s Copper Harbor Scenic Highway

Travel the Meeting of the Great Rivers Scenic Byway

On our Western Trips site see the article on the Chief Joseph Scenic Byway

Madeline Island

Madeline Island is the largest of Lake Superior’s 22 Apostle Islands.

lake superior lighthouses

Devil’s Island Lighthouse

Plenty of things to do and enjoy on Madeline Island including cottages and campgrounds, beautiful beaches and biking and hiking. Add to this unique shops and dining and a Robert Trent Jones designed golf course.

Learn all about the history of Madeline Island by visiting the Madeline Island Historical Museum.The museum was opened in the mid 1950’s. The museum was created by joining four historic log structures end to end – a small 1835 warehouse from the historic American Fur Company complex, the former LaPointe town jail, a Scandinavian-style barn, and the Old Sailors Home. Getting to the island is a lot of fun.

You can catch the Madeline Island Ferry for a two and a half mile trip to the island. The ferry runs between Madeline Island and the town of Bayfield. Access to the ferry landing is from Highway 13.

Madeline Island is the southernmost of the Apostle Islands and the only island there that is inhabited year round.

bayfield county wisconsin

Bayfield County Wisconsin Courthouse

Bayfield, Wisconsin

Bayfield, Wisconsin on Wisconsin’s Lake Superior Scenic Byway is a charming and picturesque town. Bayfield is located on the northern tip of Wisconsin and is the gateway to Madeline Island and the Apostle Islands. In addition to that, Bayfield is an active art community with unique shops, accommodations and dining.

If you enjoy B & B’s, you’ll find some excellent ones in Bayfield. One such is the Old Rittenhouse Inn. The Rittenhouse Inn offers 20 guest rooms in two Victorian homes and a private cottage with fireplaces, whirlpool tubs and spectacular Lake Superior views. Another is the Harbor Hill House located two blocks from downtown Bayfield. A third B & B to check out in Bayfield is the Artesian House B & B. This is an Eco-Friendly Contemporary Inn nestled on 25 Wooded Acres. Full Farm-to Table Breakfast, Comfortable Furnishings, Soaring Great Room with Wood Stove, and Natural Views in All Directions.

The route of the Wisconsin Lake Superior Scenic Byway captures a picturesque area of lake Superior. If your plans call for a weekend trip or vacation to northern Wisconsin this scenic byway would be a great addition to your travel plans.

(Article copyright 2014 Trips Into History. Old Bayfield Wisconsin courthouse photo is from Billerti, Creative Commons License 3.0. Remainder of photos and images in the public domain)